devozine

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First Things First

Mariellen Sawada

Gracias . . . Domo arigato gozaimasu . . . Merci . . . Sign Language: with your open palm toward your face, almost touch the tips of your fingers to your lips and then move them outward with a thankful look on your face.

In how many languages can you say thank you?

My father once told me that the first thing to learn in any language study is the word for “thank you” and that the first thing to learn when visiting another culture or country is how the people express thanks to one another. He said, “Once you understand how to say ‘thank you,’ you’ll get along OK.”

thank you grip Ftr TSP 489004203This bit of advice has turned out to be pure wisdom. Being able to express my gratitude makes a difference when I travel in a foreign country. When I can say “thanks,” somehow I feel more comfortable in asking for the millions of directions I need. When I can say “thanks,” I am more aware of and sensitive to the many gifts and graces that I encounter. When I can say “thank you,” I feel humbled and blessed to be with the people of that particular country.

Saying “thank you” is important as I travel on my faith journey too. When I can say “thanks,” somehow I feel more comfortable in asking for all the help and direction that I need. When I can say “thanks,” I am more aware of all the blessings around me. And when I can say “Thank you,” I feel humbled and blessed to be on a faith journey with God and God’s people.

 

Always use the name of our Lord Jesus Christ to thank God the Father for everything.
Ephesians 5:20 (CEV)

TRY IT: Try saying “thank you” more often and notice the difference it makes in you and in your relationships with other people.

Say “thank you” more often to God and discover the difference it can make in you and in your relationship with God.

—from devozine (November/December 1996). Copyright © 1996 by The Upper Room®. All rights reserved.

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