devozine

Spiritual Practice

LONELINESS OR SOLITUDE

Loneliness isn’t a matter of numbers. I am sometimes lonely in a large family, in a huge school, with a full schedule, and with a phone that doesn’t stop ringing. True loneliness is believing that no one cares or understands.

I love being around other people, but I often seek solitude. I like working alone, driving alone, and walking alone so that I can process what’s going on in my life. But I have to be careful. If I shut myself off from other perspectives, my thoughts tend to turn bleak. If I don’t renew my mind with God’s word or talk with other people, I begin to think that no one understands or cares, maybe not even God.

“I will never leave you nor forsake you.”
Joshua 1:5c (NIV)

No matter how isolated I am, I will never know true loneliness. At times I’ll be alone, but faith in God’s presence means the difference between loneliness and solitude.

Meagan Briggs

 

JUST A THOUGHT:

“Loneliness and solitude are two things not to get confused
       ‘Cause I spend my solitude with you.” 
               —Relient K, “Therapy

Spending time by yourself gives you a chance to reflect on matters of the heart and to express your thoughts to God. Jesus went off by himself to talk to God (Matthew 14:23) and woke up early to pray (Mark 1:35). Solitude was high on his list of priorities. I think it should be the same for us.

Anna Solomon, 19

—from devozine (May/June 2015). Copyright © 2015 by The Upper Room®. All rights reserved.

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